Harris County Bail Bonds

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Harris County Bail Bonds

A bail bond is a written agreement entered into by the individual and his sponsors that will guarantee the appearance of the individual before the court or magistrate. However, that the individual and his sponsors upon execution of such bail bond shall deposit funds with the sheriff of the county, in which the prosecution is pending, in the amount of the bond.

 

An aerial view of Houston, Texas city skyline during the daytime

While the city of Houston is itself the 4th largest city in the United States, Harris County is the 3rd most populous county. In fact, over 16% of the entire population in Texas resides in Harris County. Houston may be the largest city in Harris County, but it’s home to many other cities such as Cypress, Spring, Deer Park, and Pasadena to name a few. Likewise, while Houston has one of the highest violent crime rates in the state of Texas (and on average, higher than the national average), Harris County’s crime rate rests comfortably beneath the national average. While the United States violent crime rate average (on a scale of 1 to 100, 1 being the safest) sits at 22.7, Harris County’s last average was 20.2.

However, the same can’t be said for property crimes. Turns out, property crime in Harris County is high; so high, in fact, it’s almost 25% higher than the national average. As you’ll see ahead, a large majority of crimes documented in Harris County are just that—property crimes (burglary and theft to be more specific). While there are several corrections facilities scattered throughout Harris County, a majority of inmates can be found in the following:

  • Harris County Jail: (713) 755-5000 or click here to be transferred to their website.
  • The Joint Processing Center (Formerly the Central/Southeast Jail): (713) 247-5400
  • Harris County Corrections: (281) 459-8000 or click here to be transferred to their website.
  • Federal Detention Center (FDC): (713) 221-5400 or click here to be transferred to their website.

While the last facility, the Federal Detention Center (FDC), is the least likely to be a destination for a Harris County inmate, it’s worth including. If an inmate commits what’s formally charged as a federal crime, they will be transferred to this facility.

If you’re looking for an inmate arrested in Harris County, you can locate them by using their public inmate search here. Additionally, they provide criminal records and other inquiries to help you find all the information you need at one spot.

Harris County Crime

a graph depicting the crime rate in Harris County, Texas According to bestplaces.net, Harris County’s property crime index (on a scale of 1 to 100, 1 being the least) sits at 45.4. To put that into perspective, the United States property crime index is at 35.4—almost 25% less than Harris County alone. As mentioned above and correlating with this information, theft and burglary is among Harris County’s most commonly charged crimes. However, violent crime is also common; the following is the list of Harris County’s most common crimes:

  • Assault
  • Burglary
  • Theft
  • Robbery

Contrary to popular belief, burglary, theft, and robbery are completely different crimes—and charges. While most may bundle them together and subconsciously consider them as similar, that couldn’t be any more true. For example, theft is considered a property crime while robbery is considered violent—which results in completely different charges.

Assault Charges and Guidelines

When it comes to assault, there’s a wide area of potential charges. Depending on the nature of the crime, a judge can formally charge anywhere from a misdemeanor to a felony. A lot of the factors that play into how severe the crime is include:

  • The assailant’s relationship to the victim
  • Whether or not a weapon was used
  • The assailant’s criminal history

Depending on the situation, a defendant can walk away from an assault charge with a class A misdemeanor—even if some bodily injury was sustained. However, if the defendant had either a romantic or former romantic relationship with the victim, the crime is much more serious. In fact, even without a deadly weapon or injury—and without the victim prosecuting, even—a defendant can be charged with a first degree felony assault if the victim meets the criteria.

When it comes to bail bonds and fines, that also covers a wide area of possibility. Like previously explained, if a particular assault case included a romantic partner or interest, the Harris County judge may choose to set a high bail bond. The defendant’s criminal history also plays a huge role in the bail bond; depending on their flight risk—or risk to the public—the judge may instead choose not to allow bail as a possibility (or set a virtually impossible bond to meet). For the most part, however, Harris County assault bail bonds are as follows:

  • Class C Misdemeanor Assault: when a person makes a threat to harm another, or physically makes contact with the victim in an aggressive, provocative, or offensive manner (with no injuries).
    • Bail Bond: typically, a class C misdemeanor assault results in a $500 bail bond. With bail being 10% of a total bond, an inmate with no substantial criminal history can expect to pay $50 to get bail.
  • Class B Misdemeanor Assault: usually when it comes to sports or competitive competitions, assault is a class B misdemeanor when a non-participant assaults a participant.
    • Bail Bond: this charge results in a $2,000 fine and bail bond; and up to 6 months in jail. Because bail is 10% of a total bond, a $200 payment is required to get bail.
  • Class A Misdemeanor Assault: when the victim sustains injury, or if an elderly or disabled person was involved (regardless of injury being present).
    • Bail Bond: this results in a $10,000 fine and bail bond, and between 2 to 10 years in prison. With bail being 10% of the bond, an inmate can expect to pay $1,000 to bail out of jail.
  • Third Degree Felony Assault: when the victim is either a public servant, security officer, emergency services worker, contractor or government official.
    • Bail Bond: a third degree felony assault lands you anywhere between 2 to 10 years in jail, and a $10,000 fine and bail bond. With 10%, an inmate can bail out of jail with $1,000.
  • Second Degree Felony Assault: when the victim is an on-duty peace officer or a judge, it’s considered a second degree felony assault. If the assailant has an extensive criminal history, a judge can go right to this charge without necessarily assaulting an officer.
    • Bail Bond: a second degree felony assault lands you between 2 to 20 years in prison, and a bail bond fine set up to $10,000. To meet bail requirements, an inmate must pay $1,000.

Burglary Charges and Guidelines

Being one of Harris County’s most common property crimes, a burglary charge is completely different from theft and robbery charges. Unlike the latter two, burglary relates to the breaking-in of a building, residence, business, machine, or vehicle. Because of the wide array of possibilities, burglary charges heavily depend on the following:

  • What was broken into
  • The intent for breaking in
  • Criminal history

Naturally, breaking into a candy machine is much different than breaking into a private residence. The possibilities of a formal burglary charge span across a wide spectrum of possible scenarios, but for the most part, assault sentencing guidelines are as follows:

  • Class A Misdemeanor Burglary: attempting to break into a coin-operated or vending machine, or in some cases, a vehicle.
    • Bail Bond: this charge results in up to a year in jail, and a fine and bail bond of up to $4,000. In order to bail out of jail, an inmate must pay at least $400.
  • State Jail Felony Burglary: if someone breaks into or illegally enters a building other than a habitation, it’s a state jail felony. For state jail felonies, inmates are usually booked at Kegans International Sanctions Facility—or Kegans ISF (713) 224-6584—at 707 Top Street in Houston.
    • Bail Bond: a state jail felony results in anywhere between 180 days to 2 years in jail, along with a fine and bail bond of $10,000. To meet bail requirements and bail out of jail, an inmate will have to pay $1,000.
  • Second Degree Felony Burglary: when someone breaks into or illegally enters a habitation without the intent to commit a felony.
    • Bail Bond: a second degree felony burglary charge results in anywhere between 2 to 20 years in prison, and a fine and bail bond of up to $10,000. To bail out of jail, an inmate has to pay $1,000.
  • First Degree Felony Burglary: when someone breaks into or illegally enters a habitation with the intent to commit a felony. This also applies if any single member of the criminal party had the intention.
    • Bail Bond: this is a severe charge that carries anywhere from 5 years to life in prison. Additionally, the least possible bail bond and fine is $10,000 (which is a $1,000 bail); depending on the nature of the crime, the judge can choose not to set a bond (or set a virtually impossible bond amount).

Theft Charges and Guidelines

a graph showing the rates of crime in Harris County, TexasNearly half of all crimes in Harris County are theft charges. Unlike burglary, theft doesn’t involve breaking into a machine, habitation, or vehicle. Theft is actually pretty straight-forward: it’s the illegally stealing or taking items, objects, money, or anything of value without actual one-on-one contact with a victim. Theft charges in Harris County range anywhere from a misdemeanor to a felony, depending on the value of the stolen item and the criminal’s history.

  • Class B Misdemeanor Theft: when someone steals or takes an item worth between $50 to $500.
    • Bail Bond: a class b misdemeanor theft results in up to 180 days in jail and a bail bond of no more than $2,000. That means in order to bail out of jail, an inmate will have to pay at least $200.
  • Class A Misdemeanor Theft: when the item stolen is worth between $500 to $1,500.
    • Bail Bond: a class a misdemeanor theft results in up to 1 year in jail and a bail bond of no more than $4,000. In order to bail out of jail, an inmate will have to pay at least $400.
  • State Jail Felony Theft: when someone steals or takes an item worth between $1,500 to $20,000.
    • Bail Bond: a state jail felony theft results in jail time anywhere between 180 days to 2 years, with a bail bond of up to $10,000. In order to bail out of prison, an inmate will have to pay at least $1,000.
  • Third Degree Felony Theft: when the item stolen is worth between $20,000 and $100,000.
    • Bail Bond: someone charged with a third degree felony theft can expect anywhere between 2 to 10 years in prison, and a fine of $10,000. To bail out of jail, an inmate will have to pay $1,000.
  • Second Degree Felony Theft: when someone steals or takes an item worth between $100,000 and $200,000.
    • Bail Bond: a second degree felony theft charge results in between 2 to 20 years in prison, and a bail bond set at $10,000. Depending on the nature of the crime, this can be higher. However, for a $10,000 bond, an inmate can bail out of prison with $1,000.
  • First Degree Felony Theft: when the item stolen is worth $200,000 or more.
    • Bail Bond: for a first degree felony theft, an inmate can expect anywhere from 5 years to life in jail, and a bail bond set at least at $10,000. If the crime was particularly heinous, a judge may decide not to set a bond at all.

Robbery Charges and Guidelines

a graph showing violent crime rates for texas counties including travis, El Paso, bexar, Harris, Dallas, and Tarrant countyA robbery charge is much, much different than theft and burglary. The reason being robbery is considered a violent crime. Unlike burglary and theft, robbery includes one-on-one contact and interaction with a victim. It’s typically forceful, direct, and hostile. This is why when it comes to robbery, anything less than a second degree felony is rare. As a matter of fact, Harris County has the highest violent crime rate in the entire state of Texas.

  • Second Degree Felony Robbery: this is typically the minimum charge for a robbery, if it doesn’t include the use of a deadly weapon.
    • Bail Bond: this charge results in anywhere from 2 to 20 years in prison and a bail bond of up to $10,000. To bail out of jail, an inmate has to pay $1,000.
  • First Degree Felony Robbery: if the use of a deadly weapon was involved in the crime, it escalates to aggravated robbery, or a first degree felony.
    • Bail Bond: a first degree felony robbery charge results in between 5 years to life in prison. A bail bond for this charge is at least $10,000, however, may be much higher depending on the criminal history and nature of the crime.

As mentioned earlier, if the person committing the crime has a criminal history (either relating to robbery or not), their sentence can be much harsher. As a matter of fact, if they’re considered either a flight risk or high risk the judge may not set a bond at all.

DWI Charges and Guidelines

In addition to Harris County’s property and violent crime rate, driving while intoxicated is also extremely common. This charge depends on several factors, including the criminal history of the intoxicated driver and the passengers of the vehicle, if any. For the most part, DWI charges in Harris County can be explained with the following sentence guidelines:

  • 1st DWI Offense (Class B Misdemeanor): this results in up to 180 days in Houston County Jail and a bail bond set at $2,000. An inmate can bail out of jail by paying $200.
  • 2nd DWI Offense (Class A Misdemeanor): this charge results in up to a year in Houston County Jail and a bail bond set at $4,000. An inmate can bail out of jail by paying $400.
  • 3rd DWI Offense (Third Degree Felony): a third degree felony DWI results in anywhere between 2 to 10 years in jail, and a bail bond set at $10,000. To bail out of jail, an inmate has to pay $1,000.
  • DWI with child passenger (State Jail Felony): a state jail felony DWI results in anywhere between 180 days to 2 years in either Houston County Jail or Kegans ISF, and a bail bond set at $10,000. To bail out of jail, an inmate has to pay $1,000. Of course, this depends on the crime and risk-assessment of the criminal. If severe, the judge may choose not to allow bail.

ABC Bail Bonds

the front of ABC Bail Bonds building in Houston, TexasThere isn’t a bail bonds company in Harris County that serves like ABC Bail Bonds. As a full-service bail bonds company, we handle everything from contacting the prison to picking up the inmate—and we do it fast.

Moreover, we serve our community and offer free advice, along with in-person consultations—no appointment required. We’re located just blocks away from the Houston County Jail. Our close proximity to the jail allows us to act quickly and pick up your loved one in as little time as possible. Additionally, we offer affordable amenities like convenient payment plans and accepting cosigners.

We are located in Houston, serve the entire Harris County. We make it as easy as possible to bail someone out of jail, any time. Regardless of the bail bond amount, we can release your inmate from jail faster than any other service in Harris County. Ask us how we can help you today; speak with an expert or learn more information by calling calling us or visiting our office.

 

BAIL BONDS FOR DUI & DWI

A DWI conviction requires a blood alcohol level of 0.08% or above, but any driver can be cited for “driving while impaired” by drugs or lower concentrations of alcohol. A DWI arrest and conviction in Texas can cost the accused up to $17,000 or more when you total everything from car towing, impoundment, bail, attorney fees, court costs, hearing and fees to regain and retain a driver’s license, DWI fine, probation costs, fees for extended proof of insurance, and insurance rate hikes. ABC Bail Bonds help individuals get released from jail as soon as possible, giving them more time to organize.

 

  • Drivers and passengers can be fined up to $500 for having an open alcohol container in a vehicle.
  • DWI first offense: Up to $2,000 fine, three to 180 days in jail upon conviction, loss of driver’s license up to two years, $1,000 annual surcharge for three years to retain driver’s license.
  • DWI second offense: Up to $4,000 fine, five days to a year in jail upon conviction, loss of driver’s license up to two years, $1,500 annual surcharge for three years to retain driver’s license.
  • DWI third offense: Up to a $10,000 fine, two to 10 years in prison upon conviction, 10 to 60 days in jail if defendant receives probation, loss of driver’s license up to two years, $2,000 annual surcharge for three years to retain driver’s license.
  • DWI with a child passenger: Up to a $10,000 fine, up to two years in a state jail, loss of driver’s license for up to two years; motorists can be charged with felony child endangerment if carrying passengers younger than 14 years old.
BAIL BONDS FOR PUBLIC INTOX
  • Public intoxication in Texas is a Class C Misdemeanor and is punishable by a fine not to exceed $500 for the first two convictions.
  • A third Public Intoxication conviction is a Class B Misdemeanor and carries a sentence of up to 180 days in jail and a fine up to $2,000.

ABC Bail Bonds of Houston has been working with countless criminal cases with hundreds of thousands of people; we know how hefty these bonds can be, and are here to provide bail for anyone, anytime. We approve all bonds by the local owner, and approval from an insurance company in California or the East Coast is not necessary. For more information, give us a call or visit our office and an agent will be more than happy to assist you.

BAIL BONDS FOR ASSAULT FAMILY VIOLENCE

In Texas, a domestic violence arrest will typically be written on domestic violence bail bonds as an “assault” and the charges can range from a Class C or A misdemeanor to a felony, a far more serious offense. The punishment range for a 3rd degree felony is 2 to 10 years in prison. The punishment range for a 2nd degree felony is 2 to 20 years. Either one can carry a fine of up to $10,000. The Class C misdemeanor will not usually require a bond but, rather, a citation with a later court appearance. You can be arrested without a warrant on sight. Once arrested, you will need to make bail, either through cash or bond, and after making bail are usually released within four hours. It is important to contact a bail bondsman as early in your arrest as possible, whether it’s you or your family who contacts the bondsman.

It’s very important to ensure you hire a highly reputable bondsman with the skills and knowledge to represent and assist you well, and we at ABC Bail Bonds will do just that. Domestic violence charges are extremely serious and can end with serious outcomes and repercussions. You want a bondsman whom you trust and work with with closely.

GET OUT FAST

If you or your someone you know requires an experienced, friendly, fast, reliable, full-service, bail bonding company, call ABC Bail Bonds at (713) 222-6222 or send us a quick message below 

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