Any decisions that are made inside a courtroom are likely to have a tremendous impact on the lives of the people involved. Anyone who is expecting to make an appearance in court should always keep certain important factors in mind. Pivotal moments including a bail hearing take place inside the courtroom and making a strong presentation for your situation and concerns can go a long way towards tipping the outcome of any decisions being made in your favor.

It is important to keep in mind that meeting deadlines is an essential part of the court process, and that evidence – including witnesses, documents, or even media supporting your claims – is one of the most powerful tools available when presenting your side of the story. A person who can make a calm, thoughtful presentation with evidence to support their statements that has dutifully worked through any required deadlines has a much higher chance of turning the course of a case in a favorable direction.

To help people feel more confident about their upcoming court date, the team here at ABC Bail Bonds has decided to spend a little time going over some important key topics that can have a direct impact on their chances of a successful outcome.

Always Keep Track of Any Deadlines

As a central part of the way the justice system works in America, deadlines are deeply embedded in our laws and integral to the functionality of the courts. If you miss a deadline in your court proceedings, then the consequences can get severe quickly. From missed opportunities to present your case to potential fines including forfeiture of bail or even harsher punishments, missed deadlines can derail even the most carefully planned cases.

The best way to be sure that you are always fully aware of any upcoming deadlines or events related to your case is to maintain regular contact with your attorney, and speak with representatives of the court system well advance about your situation. By creating a detailed calendar of everything that is expected of your for at least the next several months if possible, you can make the best possible preparations for your situation.

Deciding on a Judge or Jury

In some cases, an option may be given by the courts to have your case presented before a judge or a jury. While this is not always an available choice, it is always a good idea to have a conversation with your attorney about which of these two options would be best suited to your situation. The goal of every court case is to achieve a favorable outcome, and in situations where your side may be viewed as sympathetic to other members of your community, a trial by jury could sway the decision in your favor, especially if relatable emotions are involved.

For other cases where the outcome may be decided based on technicalities and other specific legal concerns, then it may be in your best interests to skip the jury and present everything to a judge directly. While a jury may respond well to emotional situations and sympathetic scenarios, they are more likely to get confused and distracted when dealing with complicated legal discussions.

Keep a Notebook of the Proceedings

Keeping track of everything that goes on throughout your court proceedings is always a good idea. In most cases, trying to stay on top of everything inside your own head is not only difficult but impossible to present as evidence should the need ever arise. Instead, start writing down everything that takes place. From phone calls and appearances to decisions and expectations, keeping a written log of your experiences can be beneficial in a number of ways.

If there are ever questions about why a decision was made or whether or not certain important aspects of your case were handled properly, you can use your written log as evidence to support your side of the story. For example, you get a phone call from a court clerk to inform you of a changed date for your trial, but you are then penalized for not appearing on the original date. Without a written log showing that you were contacted and informed by a specific person, how could you ever prove what was said?

Keep Calm and Be Honest

When it comes time to present your case in court, one of the best things you can do is, to be honest, and maintain your composure. Being overly emotional or talking in a loud, exaggerated way can create more problems than it fixes. The courtroom is no place for emotional behavior, and even if you’re feeling angry or frustrated, keeping a lid on everything in front of the judge can make a big difference when it comes time to make a decision.

When preparing for your court case, it is always good to be as prepared as possible, but the good news is that those preparations don’t have to be overwhelming or intimidating. By keeping a notebook, following a calendar, and remembering to leave your emotions at the door, your chances of reaching a favorable decision improve dramatically.