Violating your probation is one of the worst things you can do for your reputation with the legal system you’re in. It comes with heavy consequences that most likely aren’t worth the reward, and it can even cost you jail time. If you’ve violated your probation for the first time and don’t know what to do now, here’s a guide to the consequences and how to deal with them.

You Might Risk Facing Jail Time

If you violate the terms of your probation, a warrant might be issued for your arrest and you might not get a bond for the warrant. This means you could face jail time in addition to the consequences of your last offense, and your punishment will most likely be more severe this time around. If you violate probation for the first time, your probation officer can file a report leading to a warrant for your arrest, and it can happen with a felony or misdemeanor violation. The consequences you face will mostly depend on the seriousness of your violation and your criminal record.

Violating Misdemeanor or Felony Probation

Whether you’re on felony or misdemeanor probation, judges can choose to revoke your probation and order you to do time in jail for your original sentence, even if this is your first violation. With misdemeanor probation, this isn’t always the case. You might get off with an extended probation and a warning of the consequences if you violate probation again. The consequences will vary depending on the severity of your conviction and violation, and it’s nearly impossible to know what you’ll face for a first-time violation.

Minor Probation Violations

If your violation is minor, like not completing community service hours or getting behind on court costs, you probably won’t be sentenced to jail. In these situations, your punishment is up to the discretion of the judge. You might just get a warning or an extended probation period if your violation is minor.

Not reporting to your probation officer might seem like a minor offense, but it’ll actually come with more severe consequences like revocation of your probation. Even if it’s a first-time violation, judges usually won’t tolerate this kind of offense.

Revocation (and How to Challenge It)

If you feel that you haven’t violated your probation and don’t deserve to face revocation, you can challenge the decision by requesting a hearing. During this hearing, the state will be required to show evidence that you actually violated your probation. If they can’t produce the proper evidence, your probation can’t be revoked. Your defense attorney will be able to help you start the hearing process if you voice your concerns. 

Facing Jail Time? ABC Bail Bonds Can Help

If you’ve been arrested and risk facing jail time, call ABC Bail Bonds today. Our bail bondsmen are available 24/7 to bail you out of jail as soon as possible so you can get back to your life. Staying in jail means missing out on work, bills, school, and important time with your family, so don’t let yourself stay locked up. If you can’t afford your bail, let us know so we can work with you to make a payment plan based on your income. Call or visit our website to get in touch with an experienced bail bondsman today!